Week 7 - How to Boldly Be Yourself (Lindsay Tjepkema's Story)

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This is a podcast episode titled, Week 7 - How to Boldly Be Yourself (Lindsay Tjepkema's Story). The summary for this episode is: The world needs us to boldly be ourselves. Oftentimes, we don't have the confidence to believe in ourselves and our talents. We listen to other people’s opinions of our lives before we listen to our own opinions, our own intuition, and our own ideas. To own our uniqueness, we must be courageous and confident. Once we shed the expectations others have set for us, we allow ourselves to be ourselves, and we find our meaning and purpose. In this week’s episode, we will listen to Lindsay Tjepkema — CEO and founder of Casted — as she tells us the story of how she literally and figuratively found her voice. In her talk, Lindsay talks about being “too much” of everything and” not enough” of anything. She shares her journey of self-confidence, and how she had the courage to own her uniqueness. Throughout her life, Lindsay has been listening to people tell her that she wasn't who they thought I should be. Over the years, she was told that she was too tall, too small, too loud, too quiet, too much, not enough, too young, and "too" everything. After years of putting her value in what other people said, she finally found her voice in podcasting. The podcast she started as a VP at a global SAS company led her to start a company of her own: Casted, the first and only marketing platform built around podcasts. Although it took her some time, she has regained the confidence she lost as a little girl. Listen in to learn more about how Lindsay had the courage to boldly be herself, and how she literally and figuratively found her voice. And tune in next week to hear from our last speaker about how to stand tall in your story and rise and thrive during these difficult times.
Owning our uniqueness takes courage and confidence
00:33 MIN
Introduction to Lindsay Tjepkema
00:40 MIN
How Lindsay lost the confidence she had as a little girl
01:29 MIN
How other people's opinions got in the way of Lindsay's ambitious, hardworking career
01:06 MIN
Why Lindsay felt like she was "too everything" and "not enough anything"
00:37 MIN
How Lindsay literally and figuratively found her voice
00:52 MIN
How to boldly be yourself and use your unique talents today
00:52 MIN

Rebecca: You know that feeling when you're fired up about something, something that you really want to get right. It might be a project, something about your career, some big decision and you reach out and you look for some guidance and advice or feedback. And all of a sudden the feedback is so conflicting or you're just now no longer excited and inspired. You're confused and now you're lacking confidence about the whole thing. Too often, we don't put enough weight into our own opinions, our own intuition, our own strengths and ideas because we're each wired to be unique with our thoughts, our opinions and our ideas. In fact, our personal brand is as unique as our fingerprints. And owning that uniqueness takes courage and confidence. Our next speaker, Lindsay Tjepkema, CEO and founder of Casted, the first and only platform for B2B podcasting, is going to talk about her experience owning her uniqueness with courage and confidence. I guarantee you're going to see and hear your own story in hers. Let her courage inspire you because owning her story has led her to this role as a CEO and a founder of an amazing company. When we allow ourselves to be ourselves, that's when we find that elusive thing called meaning and purpose. Here's Lindsay. Will you please give a warm welcome for Lindsay Tjepkema?

It was new year's eve and I did something that I've never done before. I embraced a mantra, a word or phrase that's meant to just ground you throughout the year. And then I wrote it on a chalkboard because that seemed like it would make sense. And I put that chalkboard on my wall and it served as that mantra for that year. You see, I'd never done that before, because I just never really had a word or phrase that would stick out to me like this, that I wanted to hold on to for a year. But this one, this boldly be yourself, that came to me unsolicited. And I wish that I could tell you that it was the result of some Marie Kundli experience or some creative endeavor, but it didn't. Came out of a lot of pain, out of years, out of a lifetime of listening to people tell me that I wasn't who they thought I should be. When I was a little girl, my mom would tell you about how anytime we had visitors over, I would run upstairs and I would put on dress up clothes and I would get all ready to go and then I would shout down, mom, dad, I'm ready so that they could obviously come gather around and watch me, I'm not kidding, sachet down the stairs in all of my glory firmly in the spotlight of my own show. And we talk about standing tall in your story, I was so confident as that little girl, but over time, over those years, that little girl was told to come off the stage. And when I think about that, because when I was in school, I was smart and I was outgoing and I loved learning. And that was misinterpreted, that was twisted around as too ambitious, too eager. And I was told to step back out of the spotlight lest I get too much attention. But then I got into theater and I became a pretty serious singer, voice lessons and all. And then I went to audition for our most elite program that we had in our school and I didn't make it, but when I talked to the director about it, she told me," Yeah, I think you probably have the talent, but I don't know, there's just something about you. It's just too much." I know. My 17 year old self turned down the volume on who I was, stepped back from ambitions of being the star and took on much more of what I was supposed to do in her eyes as being a more supporting actress role. And then I made it into that group so lesson learned, note taken, be more likable. And then one of my first jobs after school, after college, I worked for a boss that was one of those early is on time, on time is late, late is unacceptable. One of those types that set a really high bar. And for this overachiever, I rose to that challenge. And he didn't really like me at first because I was too young, I was too kind, I was too nice. And I went out there and worked to win him over by overworking, by striving, by grinding, by doing whatever it took to get on his radar to win him over and it worked. Again, note taken. In the years that followed, I did everything that it took to just work hard to get ahead. And it worked, my career started to take off and it was all built on a foundation of striving and grinding and overworking and just putting in every hour of every day. Until I ran headfirst into being a young mom and working for a company where I felt like I really had to prove myself because your whole life changes when you have a baby. And so I had to prove that I was still that hardworking, ambitious professional, which is why it cut me to the core when the leader of that company that I was working for, told me that I was cold, abrasive, inflexible and overly assertive, which really cut me. Not only because I was vulnerable at that time, but because I had come to know her, a fellow mom, as a friend. Again, note taken, I softened and I sought out to become more of who she wanted me to be. And then years later as I was negotiating the details of another job. The CEO of that company told me that he really liked me and that he was sure I was talented and Hey, he had three daughters of his own so he was really all about women in the workplace, but he just, I quote, couldn't justify giving some cute girl that kind of salary. Yeah. To make it worse, the same exact salary that I knew for a fact, my male counterpart was making. Now apparently I was too female. Over the years, I had been told that I was too tall, too small, too loud, too quiet, too much, not enough, too young, too everything, too much of a mom at work. And because of work, not enough of a mom outside of it. I was too everything and not enough of anything. And I was putting my value in what other people thought I should be and that was exhausting. And I thought about all that I had done, all that I had accomplished, an increasingly more successful career, three kids, including as she mentioned, twins, because I made three humans, two of which were at the same time you all. And I thought, "You know what? The common thread here is me. Why am I putting so much stake in what other people are saying?" I returned to work after that holiday break with this boldly be myself mantra and I set out to do what one does after holiday break and I put together the marketing plan for our company. And I thought, you know what? After 15 years of experience in marketing, we need a podcast. This company needs podcasts, it'll be good for our brand. And I faced some pushback. Why would we do this? Why would we not go with the status quo? What we're doing is working. But I said," Nope, we're doing it. We're using my budget. We're pushing for it." I did a podcast. And over the next 12 months, I got to be the host of that podcast. And I literally and figuratively found my voice. That podcast led to me leaving that really great job as a VP at a global SAS company to start a company of my own. And so I stand here today as the CEO and co founder of my own company, Casted, which is the first and only marketing platform built around podcasts. And get this, exactly one month ago today, I stood on a different stage and I launched that company out into the world, surrounded by people who showed up for me, the real me, including this incredible group of Rise And Thrive women, all because I stepped out to boldly be myself. And I think about, what if I hadn't. I think about that little girl in dress-up clothes on a stage of her own, who was told to step back out of that spotlight. And although it took some time, that little girl is grown up now, standing here today in dress-up clothes, on a stage, in a spotlight, standing tall in her story as a badass woman who is boldly being herself.

Rebecca: I told you you'd be inspired. Man, let me ask you, what do you need to let go of today? What have you been told about you that just isn't serving you well, maybe even holding you back. What beliefs about yourself have you held onto for far too long that just aren't true? A lot of times when I'm working with my coaching clients and they're bogged down with these kinds of things, like Lindsay was, things that were said to them. Sometimes it goes all the way back to middle school and these things that just really aren't true. I ask my clients to find evidence that they could be true, because if you can't find evidence, then let it go. Just like in a court of law, if you can't find evidence, they throw out the case and The world needs you to boldly be yourself. Once you shed yourself off those expectations that others have set of you that aren't serving you well, take a hard look at who you are. What are you great at? What do you love? What inspires you? Go ahead and make a list of your unique gifts and talents and then ask yourself, how are you using them today in your work in your life? And how could you be bolder in the way that you're using them? And then look for evidence of you being your true self, choose to believe all of those things about yourself, because trying to be anyone else is exhausting. If you want to dig into this more, go to standtallinyourstory. live, click on the Business Is Human link, pop in your info. Let's just schedule a time to chat. We're starting a new group here in Indianapolis in late October. And if you're not in Indianapolis, we'll have some virtual options available for you too. But here's some things to think about too, if you're asking yourself if this is the right thing for you. Do you want to live a story worth telling? Are you the kind of person that doesn't shy away from exploring what's next in your life and your career? Are you looking around at your life, your work, your success and thinking," I thought success was going to look a certain way, but now that I have it," you're still wondering," There's got to be more than this," or maybe you're looking for other high achievers to speak into your life and your career to get some perspectives from outside of your company that can both support your dreams and maybe challenge your thinking. Sometimes when you're the boss, there's not enough people that are challenging your thinking in a beautiful, inspiring way. And are you the kind of person that isn't afraid to challenge traditional markers of success or methods of achievement? Are you willing to take a different perspective, try something new? Do you want to be known for exceptional leadership? And mostly this kind of group is for people that want to skip the cheap seats of training, or think that you can do this through self exploration and you're ready to just go for some transformation. If any of that rings true, sounds like it's worthy of a conversation, that's what I'm here for. You can pop your info in that Business Is Human link, or just email me at rebecca @ WEthrive. life. We'd love to dig into this work with you. All right. Thanks so much for being here. Next week we have our final speaker in this series from Stand Tall In Your Story. I can't believe the how fast it's gone. All right. Thanks so much and make it a great day.( singing).

DESCRIPTION

The world needs us to boldly be ourselves. Oftentimes, we don't have the confidence to believe in ourselves and our talents. We listen to other people’s opinions of our lives before we listen to our own opinions, our own intuition, and our own ideas. To own our uniqueness, we must be courageous and confident. Once we shed the expectations others have set for us, we allow ourselves to be ourselves, and we find our meaning and purpose.


In this week’s episode, we will listen to Lindsay Tjepkema — CEO and founder of Casted — as she tells us the story of how she literally and figuratively found her voice. In her talk, Amber talks about being “too much” of everything and” not enough” of anything. She shares her journey of self-confidence, and how she had the courage to own her uniqueness.


Throughout her life, Lindsay has been listening to people tell her that she wasn't who they thought I should be. She has been told to step out of the spotlight and come off the stage. When she auditioned for an elite program in high school, the director told her, “Yeah, I think you probably have the talent, but I don't know, there's just something about you. It's just too much." This comment made Lindsay step back from her ambitions of being a star. She decided to become more likable and took on a supporting actress role. However, the boss at her first job out of college set the bar really high for his employees. He thought Lindsay was too kind and too young, so she won him over by overworking and grinding. She then built the foundation of her career on overachieving, working hard, and striving. After becoming a young mom, she felt the need to prove she was still an ambitious and hardworking professional. Then one day, the leader of the company told Lindsay she was cold, abrasive, inflexible, and overly assertive. These words really cut Lindsay and so Lindsay decided to soften herself. However, at her next job as she was negotiating her salary, the CEO of the company told her, he couldn't justify giving “some cute girl” that kind of salary. Over the years, she was told that she was too tall, too small, too loud, too quiet, too much, not enough, too young, and "too" everything. After years of putting her value in what other people said, she finally found her voice in podcasting. The podcast she started as a VP at a global SAS company led her to start a company of her own. Although it took her some time, she has regained the confidence she lost as a little girl. In her own words, she is now, “standing tall in her story as a badass woman who is boldly being herself.”


Listen in to learn more about how Lindsay had the courage to boldly be herself, and how she literally and figuratively found her voice.


And tune in next week to hear from our last speaker about how to stand tall in your story and rise and thrive during these difficult times.


This year, Rebecca has built a similar experience called, “Business is Human,” which is open to both men and women. Right now, she is looking for 4-5 men and 4-5 women join the group for a 9-month experience in Indianapolis. If you are interested in that opportunity, go to standtallinyourstory.live and tell Rebecca a little bit about yourself.


To check out the Stand Tall in Your Story 8-week series, go to standtallinyourstory.live